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CANADA A REFUGE FOR THE SLAVE.   141

divided into lots of fifty acres each, for which the settler was to pay in ten annual instalments with interest.

Mr. King formed the nucleus of the settlement by giving his fifteen freed Negroes their land in 185o. The place became known as the " Buxton Settlement", in honor of Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton of England, whose life-long devotion to the cause of the slave in the colonies of Great Britain had resulted in the Imperial act of 1833, by which the very last vestige of slavery was removed from the Canadian provinces. In 1853 one hundred families had settled on the " King tract", while many others had occupied improved farms in the neighborhood. They had been helpful to each other, and most of the farms had been cleared and homes built by means of " chopping bees", those warm-hearted, neighborly institutions of early Canadian times. The settlers also found employment on the farms of their white neighbors, and by the sale of rail-way ties to the builders of railways then in course of construction. Within fifteen years from the commencement of the settlement all the land purchased by the Association was allotted and peopled by one thousand colored settlers. Farms were cleared, houses built after a prescribed model, roads opened up, and school-houses, a brick hotel, and industrial buildings erected. Meanwhile the religious and educational interests of the people had not been neglected. The sale of intoxicating liquors had been prohibited, Mr. King had been sustained there as a Presbyterian missionary by the Synods of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, religious ordinances had been provided for the numerous Baptists and Methodists in the neighbor-hood by the church authorities, and elementary training in general knowledge afforded by both week-day and Sundayschools.t

 

 

I See " Place-Names of Canada-. by George Johnson. F. S. S., and a " A Short History of the Presbyterian Church in Canada by William Gregg, M. A.. D. D.


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