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CANADA A REFUGE FOR THE SLAVE.   139

remarking that if in those days a man had been as " black as two midnights in a dark cellar" he would have found ready aid on his arrival in Canada. One of the most remarkable agents of the " railroad" was a full-blooded Negress, who had been for twenty years a slave. Shrewd and courageous, always armed with a gun or revolver—the two-fold purpose of which any wavering member of her contingent was given to understand, this yen• ordinary-looking black woman had succeeded in carrying off, with her own family, nearly three hundred other slaves, winning for her success in leading her people out of their land of bondage the appropriate appellation of " Moses".

Lively demonstrations sometimes attended the first moments after arrival in the land of promise. Among a party of four, in charge of Harriet Tubman, alias " Moses ", on one occasion was a young man named Joe. After a narrow escape the train on which they were bound north approached the bridge below Niagara Falls and other members of the party burst into singing, but Joe, not disposed to shout until quite out of the wood, sat motionless with his head buried in his hands, waiting for—he hardly knew what ! As the train crossed the bridge the others called to him in the utmost excitement to come and look at the Falls, but he could not be stirred. A moment later, when they were on the descent from the middle of the bridge. " Moses" rushed at him and shaking him fiercely exclaimed : " Joe, you've shock de lion's paw ! Joe, you're free "! Then " the strong man, who could stand the greatest physical suffering without a quiver, burst into hysterical sobbing and singing, so much did the touch of Canadian soil, the breath of free British air, mean to these men". More demonstrative still was the action of another escaped slave—Stanford. This man, who had had a terrible struggle to escape his pursuers—who in fact, after his first arrival at St. Catharine's had been kidnapped in the middle of the night


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