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CANADA A REFUGE FOR THE SLAVE.   13%

the lake and across the Detroit river into Canada. And the sequel the visiting minister saw in her own pleasant Canadian home, to which she had only gone after having some time refused to marry on account of antecedents revealed by her own lips. In that town the brother joined her at the close of a long imprisonment.'

There may have been less of romance, but there. was little less of cruelty in the experience of James King, an escaped slave who lived many years in the service of the father of Thomas Conant, author of the recently-published " Upper Canada Sketches". His original owner, the head of one of the leading families of Virginia, was also his father, but other sons, becoming sensitive as they grew up to the presence of their slave half-brother, induced the father to sell him. His new owner wished to place him in a leading position on his large farm, but was prevented by the old overseer, whose jealousy prompted him to the use of all possible expedients to bring the young man under the lash, from which he only narrowly escaped. At length, goaded almost to madness during the absence of his master, he fled to the woods, where, fed by neigh-boring slaves, he resolved to await the master's return ; but the appearance of an advertisement offering a large reward for his apprehension as a runaway, led him to a greater distance. Again alarmed, he " followed the North Star by night" and slept during the day until he reached Harrisburg, Pa. From that place he walked by day, boldly inquiring his way to Canada, but always careful to keep going northward. Canada he had always heard of among the slaves, but had supposed it to be a land where the wild geese went and everything was covered by feathers ; yet onward he plodded in search of freedom. From Charlotte, N. V., he worked his passage in a small vessel bound to Colborne, Ont., and in 1854 made the

1 E. H. Smith, in New York Eremites Post.


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