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CANADA A REFUGE FOR THE SISVE.   135

the fugitives, and their fathers drove through storm and darkness to save from worse than death the people committed to their charge".

In a pleasant home many rears since in an Ontario town a minister sent across the border by the Abolitionists to see how the escaped fugitives were faring. heard from his hostess, a woman of great beauty and the wife of a cultured young Englishman, an interesting life story. An inquiry as to his acquaintance with the Hon. Joshua R. Giddings and two or three other prominent men of Ohio, and a reply in the affirmative, elicited the remark that to them she owed her life. She was the daughter of a Virginian, a man supposed to be wealthy and of good moral character. With him, a widower, lived a son and daughter—the latter, accomplished especially in music, a favorite in society. On the sudden death of the father, the son, called home from Yale, learned to his sad surprise that not only had his father died insolvent but that the young girl in the home whom he had fondly regarded as a sister was not the daughter of his own mother, but of a slave. and that no provision had been made for her freedom. As the father's " property" as well as his daughter, the young girl, though her appearance indicated nothing but the purest Caucasian blood, had, in accordance with the usage of slavery in general and the law of Virginia in particular, to be placed on the auction-block and sold, subject to the usual indignities, at public sale with the father's other possessions. A slave trader, then purchasing for some other market, outbid all competitors, became her owner, and shut her up in a cell in the prison until a gang should be ready to leave for the South.

The brother, aware of the penalty of imprisonment in the penitentiary for aid in the rescue of a slave, but desperate at the idea of the sister falling into the hands of such a man for such a purpose. resolved to save her, if


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