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DESTINY OF THE SLAVE.   119

leave the country were willing to abandon their property for a small return. Many slaves were sent out of the provinces for sale in a less demonstrative manner. Depositions were laid before the Council of Upper Canada in March, 1/9J to the effect that a Negro girl had been violently carried off and sold by one Fromand to a person in the United States, and that others were intending in the same manner to dispose of their Negroes ; and orders were given the attorney-general to prosecute Fromand.' For such a traffic the constant communication by shipping between the Maritime Provinces and various ports in the United States and Rest Indies gave special advantages. Captain Lemuel Little, of the Halifax schooner " Patty", when in 1784 he carried nineteen slaves from Halifax to Surinam ; and Captain Pierre Doucet, of Clare, on his way in August, 1791, in his schooner " Peggy" from Jamaica to Cuba with ten slaves, were neither the first nor the last Nova Scotia sea-captains engaged in the slave trade. Probate court records in 1769, already quoted, contain an item respecting the proceeds of the sale of a slave boy in Carolina by a Halifax business man. It is certain that on more than one occasion, and it is believed that on many occasions, slaves were taken from Shelburne and Halifax to the West Indies for sale ; the account books of Benjamin De\Wolfe, one of the earlier merchants of Windsor, show sales in the same islands of slaves from Hams county ; and Lieutenant Clarkson's manuscript journal, though covering only the last few months of 1791, gives several instances of schemes for carrying Negroes—not in every case slaves after human law—to the United States for the evident purpose of sale. " Some years ago", wrote Mr. Blowers. to Ward Chipman, when the latter was preparing for the Fredericton slave case of 18o9, " I had determined to

I " Report of Canadian Archives. 1891.


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