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118   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

St John river, only nineteen slaves being reported about that time by Amos Botsford from the county of Westmoreland, then including the county of Albert, and few if any from the county of Charlotte.' Only a slave here and there was manumitted by the master during life : a number were set free according to the last will and testament. Of those liberated a few score may have been included in the living freight of twelve hundred carried away by Lieutenant Clarkson to Africa ; a few others may have joined Lieutenant Francis Miller, who at the time of Clarkson's visit was endeavoring to enlist colored men at Halifax for the Black Carolina corps, then doing military service in the Vest Indies. Numerous slaves must have been carried away from Nova Scotia by that section of Loyalists—larger than some persons have supposed—who after the lapse of several years returned to the vicinity of former homes, in the neighboring republic. The last slave sold on New Haven Green—if not the last sold in Connecticut--was Lois Tritten, born in Halifax in 1i99. This slave, who bore a family name found in the old records of St. Paul's church and the Halifax registry of deeds, and who was sold in New Haven in 1324, lived until June 11, 1894.

Others were sent abroad, where slave labor proved more profitable and slaves commanded higher prices. A speculation like that of John \Ventworth, Esq., in 1784, in sending a party of slaves to Surinam for plantation labor there, would serve as an object lesson, and secure probable frequent imitation, at that period in particular, when many disbanded officers and others intending to

 

 

' At the time of the taking of the first general census in New Bruns-wick, in 0324, fourteen hundred and three people of color were enumerated. and of these the Rev. W. O. Raymond, M. A., of St. John, than whom I know no better authority on New Brunswick history, remarks : 'o I think that the majority were at one time slaves or the children of slaves, and many of them lived or had lived in the families of their owners", with whom they came to New Brunswick.


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