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t16   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

of the kind are very significant. That Daniel Brown, in his advertisement of a Negro woman in the New Bruns-wick Royal Gazelle of October 16, 1809, should guarantee a good title to any purchaser of the woman accentuates rather than removes the doubt.

Many persons possessing slaves took advantage at this period of the system of limited arrangement which Chief-justice Strange had sought some years before to introduce. In the last year of the century there appeared in a Halifax newspaper a characteristic advertisement : " For sale for a term of years, as may be agreed on, a likely, stout Negro girl, aged eighteen years, good natured, fond of children, and accustomed to both town and country work. For full particulars apply at the old parsonage, Dutchtown"—the name at that time of the north suburbs of Halifax. One of the latest known advertisements of this kind appears in a Halifax paper for 18zo: "To be sold :—Two years and a half time of a black servant man; is a good plain cook, understands family work and the care of horses".

In some instances the assignment of a more or less distant period for freedom may have been prompted by motives of justice to young slaves. A probable illustration of such arrangement is found in the will of the Rev. James Scovil, first rector of Kingston, King's county, N. B., dated in 1804, proved in 1809 and duly recorded : "I give to my wife Amy", so runs the document, " the use of one-third of my landed property as the law directs, and . likewise I give and bequeath to my said wife the use of my servant boys, Robert and Sampson, the first being twelve years old the twelfth of March last, the other ten the twentieth of August next, under the following restrictions—that is to say—that at the age of twenty-six years they shall be set at liberty provided they do faithfully discharge the duties of servants until that period ; and I


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