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DECLINE OF SLAVERY.   93

 

 

Slavery would be a too costly thing for Canada to-day; what must it have been a century since? What could Isaac Wilkins do with his slaves among those granite rocks at Point Carleton in Shelburne harbor? or what could Charles Oliver Breuff with his fifteen in Shelburne town ? And how John Grant, weary and ill and dispirited by his heavy losses as a Loyalist, and how his gentle wife, who like thousands of women at that sad period had left all other friends to keep her only unto him". when they crossed by boat from Mount Denson to Loyal Hill and found their six children safely beside them, must have wondered what they were going to do with that other group—that group of nine dark faces ! During the three or four years in which rations of pork and flour were provided for servants equally with their masters the pressure for food supplies was not a so serious matter, but after that period the supply for the appetites of those nine slaves of varying ages, from " Sam " at thirty-three and " Nance" at twenty-nine down to little " Betty" at three, must have been an important question at Loyal Hill. It was just about this time that Captain Grant lessened the burden by disposing of one of the girl slaves, a gift to his daughter Rachel from her Dutch grandfather, to Richard Killo, a Halifax innkeeper.'

I Captain Grant had secured a commission when a mere boy in the Forty-second Royal Highland regiment (Black Vatch% With that celebrated regiment he had fought at Fontenoy in 1745, and in 1756 had landed at New York. In 1756 he retired from the army, and during the following year married Sarah Bergen, a descendant of Hans Hansen Bergen, an early Norwegian-Dutch settler of New York. After having served with the colonial troops at the capture of the Havanrah and in the expedition to Crown Point, he had settled quietly down at his home in Jamaica, Long Island, when the stirring scenes of the Revolution once more aroused him. At first, on account of the pronounced Rl.ig tendencies of his wife's friends, he retired to the %Vest Indies, whence, however, he soon returned to take an active part in the conflict on the side of Britain. One wound, of several received on battle-fields, shortened his days. His losses of various kinds were estimated by him, at five thousand pounds_ The tract of three thou-sand acres granted him within a few miles of the fort at Crown Point. and confiscated by the authorities of Vermont, became thickly settled in a very few years after the close of the war. In view of this loss the government


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