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TREATMENT OF THE SLAVE.   85

she wished, and instructed his three sons to pay her ten pounds a year during her life. And Stephen Reed, of Amherst, in 18ot requests his sons "jointly to provide for and comfortably take care of the black man and black woman slaves belonging to me, during their natural lives". An equally benevolent intention may have prompted the slave-owner who either gave or bequeathed a slave for the " use and benefit of the wardens and vestry of St. Paul's", Halifax.

The truth of the assertion of Lieutenant Clarkson, if understood in relation to the moral and spiritual welfare of the slaves, would also admit of very serious question. From a share in some at least of the church ordinances of the time they were not debarred. As early as in 1769 an entry appears in the records of the Protestant Dissenting church, now St. Matthew's Presbyterian, of Halifax, of " Samuel, Susannah and Elizabeth, children of William and Charity Willet, John, a Negro servant", baptized by " the Rev. Mr. John Seccombe". Seven years earlier—in 176z—an entry of the baptism of two Negro girls, Lucia and Frances, was made in the register of St. Paul's parish ; and in 1775 another of " a negro of Mr. McNamara's". Subsequently to the baptism of Governor Wentworth's numerous party many others took place, though a distinction was not always clearly drawn in the records between the candidates slave and free. Similar entries are also found in the records of Annapolis, Sydney. C. B., and others of the older parishes of the provinces. In the register of the parish church. Prince William, York county. N. B., may be read in the handwriting of the Rev. Frederick Dibblee. first rector of Woodstock, under date of July 28. 1798: " Baptized two Black children, the property of Col. Ellegood, named Sally and Adam Wise". The early parish records at Maugerville, N. B.. have similar entries. On September 14. 1788, John Beardsley, the rector of that


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