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TREATMIE\T OF THE SLAVE.   83

been born in 1773), and died not so many years ago, near Weymouth, N. S."

Some serio-comic aspects of slave life are presented by certain local traditions. The treatment of a slave by an old Loyalist officer at or near Woodstock, N. B., must have given more pleasure to the " small boy " than to the slate. Each day the old gentleman rode up to the tavern for his accustomed potation, followed by a slave on foot, who at the door handed the filled glass to his master, and as regularly executed the most dexterous possible movement in order to evade the blow from the master's stick which invariably accompanied the return of the emptied glass. Not less amusing. to two individuals, was the treatment of a slave at Annapolis. which tradition imputes to Joseph \Winniett, a leading member of a family long prominent in the old Nova Scotian capital. A slave girl had one day during Mr. Winniett's absence from home provoked to the utmost the patience of her mistress. On his return Mrs. Winniett promptly demanded a severe whipping for the slave at the hands of her master. Having ordered the girl to an adjoining room, Mr. Vinniett charged her to scream at the top of her voice, while he proceeded to apply his whip with such vigor to the furniture of the room as made all rattle again until at the opened door the satisfied mistress informed the refractory girl that she had learned a lesson without any mistake this time!

In some cases the attachments between the slaves and the families of their owners were strong and lasting. A gentleman whose early life was spent in St. John, N. B., tells of a slave brought to Hampton by his maternal grandfather, Isaac Ketchum, a Loyalist. This slave was older than his mother, and through all the trials and critical periods of that mother's married life had proved so faithful a friend that a resting place had been promised her at death beside the mother. Many years passed, and


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