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74   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

Representatives of these blended races were to be found among the slave population of the British American provinces. Frequent mention is made in documents of the period of " Mulattos", " Mullottas" or " Molattos". Benjamin Condon. of Cornwallis, in 1777 gives to his son, James Condon, "the home farm", one half of certain undivided upland, "also my Spanish Indian man servant", for whom he asks his son to make comfortable provision in the event of his being incapacitated by age. sickness or other cause. Judge Ritchie, of Halifax, remarks that there frequently in his boyhood came to his father's house in Annapolis an old colored man with long hair and sharp features, and known as "Old Marsh", who was often spoken of by the judge's mother as one of the slaves of his grandfather, John Ritchie, Esq., and was supposed to be a native of Madagascar ; and among slaves set free by Judge Isaac Allen of Fredericton, in the very first years of the century, is said to have been a girl carried off from the East Indies and sold at New York.

Slaver- throughout British North America was generally of a mild type, like that of the Northern states. The Rev. John Wiswall, the first rector of Wilmot, N. S., driven by the Whigs in 1/76 from his parish at Casco Bay, Maine, sent this message to his slave, Dinah, in a letter from Boston to a near relative : " Remember me to Dinah. I allow her to live with you or where she pleases until she hears from me. I am determined not to sell her to anybody. This you can assure her from met.' Judge Reeves, in speaking of slavery in Connecticut, whence a number of the New Englanders came to Nova Scotia, shows the system in practice in that province to have been "very far from the absolute, rigid kind. The master had no control over the life of his slave. If he killed him, he was liable to the same punishment as if he

t Manuscript Journal of Rev. John Wlswall.


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