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ORIGIN OF THE SLAVE.   i.i

Tuscaroras—ending in the defeat of the latter, left a large number of Indian prisoners in possession of the Carolinians, who shipped them as slaves to the other colonies. There the commission of cruel outrages by several of them led the General Courts, in the northern colonies in particular, to prohibit, under severe penalties, the further introduction of Indians as slaves. In the meantime, many Guinea slaves, regarded as of greater value than the Indians, who had proved poor and dangerous house servants, had been brought into the colonies; and both at the north and south the two races had intermarried, the Indians at length becoming absorbed in the much greater number of blacks, a limited amalgamation also taking place between the latter and the whites.' Besides these blended races were also some others whom the cupidity and cruelty of English captains had led them to carp- away from other sections of Africa than Guinea and from ports in the East Indies. A similar variety of race was found in the free Negroes sent to Nova Scotia, as these were described in the lists prepared by order of Sir Guy Carleton at New York.'

Johns Hopkins " University Studies". Series xi and :iv. On the savage service of that day James Russell Lowell makes this comment : " let any housewife of our day who does not find the Keltic element in domestic life so refreshing as to Mr. Arnold in literature, imagine a household with one wild Pequot woman. communicated with by signs, for its maidof-all-work, and take courage. Those were serious times indeed when your cook might give warning by taking your scalp or chignon, as the case might be, and making off with it into the woods". "Indian men", Mrs. Alice Morse Earle remarks, "often left their masters dishonestly dressed in their masters' fine apparel. and even wearing beribboned flaxen wigs, which must have been comic to a degree, over their harsh, saturnine countenances". It after all seems only natural " that any such wild child of the forests should have fled away from the clamped atmosphere of a Puritan household and house" adds Mrs. Earle. The same writer, in "Colonial Days in Old New York". remarks that she " has noted the fact that nearly all .African-born Negroes who have become leaders in this country, or men of marked note in any way, have been Guinea men".

s See Vol. 413 of the "Manuscript Doswneats of Nova Scotia", consisting of extracts from the " Dorchester Papers". in which the origin of each freed-man sent by Sir Guy Carleton from New York to Nova Scotia is given.


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