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68   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

Of twenty-two " servants" on the " provision" roll of the disbanded officers and soldiers and Loyalists " settling or about to settle" in June, 1784, in Prince Edward Island, then the " Island of St. John", six were in a separate column for " whites"; it may therefore be inferred that the others were colored " servants for life". Nearly all the latter were in the service of officers of the disbanded First Battalion of the King's Rangers, and were thus distributed : " Samuel Hayden. captain, three ; Edward Mainwaring, captain, three; John Throckmonon, captain, two; Peter Anderson, ensign, two ; Joseph Beers, ensign. two ; Alex. Smith, adjutant, two ; Lewis Davis, surgeon, one". Two servants are also enumerated with George Burnes, captain in the Royal Fencible American Regiment.

The number of American Loyalists who found homes in the island of St. John in succeeding months was not large, and few of them were, as far as can be learned, owners of slaves. A part of the proprietors among whom the fertile lands of the island had been so lavishly divided were ready to give up a portion of their large grants to the disinherited strangers, but the loss of some of the governor's despatches prevented that fact from becoming widely known. A few months later an agent was sent to the Loyalists in Nova Scotia with offers from the governor and proprietors to induce them to remove to the island colony. At Shelburne the agent found a number of " decent, steady people, mostly farmers", disappointed in the quality of the land on which they had been located, and glad to make a fresh venture. With a party of sixty of these, Loyalists and others, including John Brecken, George ?dabs., John Chambers, Nathanael, Stephen and William Wright, who arrived at Charlottetown from Shelburne on July 26, 1784, on their way to Bedeque, came no slaves : whether any bondmen were on board the


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