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58   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

of the sons, highly respected for his Christian character, died at Bedford two years ago ; Abbie Mingo, a daughter of the slave freed by Dr. McGregor in 1787, died in November. 189S, at Truro, a pen.-inner, during the later years of a very long life, of the First Presbyterian church of that town.

Any harsh judgment of the clerical slave-holder at Truro according to the standard of to-dav would deserve, at the same time, to be met with protest. Casting a glance backward, he might have regarded himself, in his treatment of his bondwoman, as a man of advanced views. Only a century before, Cotton Mather, a well-known New England divine--he who so eagerly advocated the adoption of certain desperate remedies for the " diabolical" disease of witchcraft, had approved the proposal to intercept William Penn and his fellow-Quakers on the ocean on their way to their new colony, and sell "the whole lot" at Barhadoes as slaves. By way of justification Mr. Cock might have cited the fact that Cotton Mather himself, who had only died sixty years previously, had been given by his congregation a Negro worth fifty pounds, and that in gratitude for the gift many a noble resolution had been made by him to save, with God's blessing, his bondman's soul ; and the further fact that Jonathan Edwards, a much more distinguished divine, who had died only thirty rears before the date of Dr. McGregor'sattack, had once offered a puncheon of wine for an abler bodied slave.' To the well-known names of Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards he might have added those of Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Williams and Ezra Stiles, two of whom at least were then living. .And he might have asserted, without fear of contradiction, that scores, if not hundreds, of slave-holding ministers could at the time be found on the American continent, and more than one of them in the

" Independent ", New York. Jan. t, 1891.


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