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THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   55

legal property at the South, the court at once acquitted him, and the slave, for the hundred bushels of potatoes, became the undisputed property of Mangham. In probate court records for the same year is the will of Thomas Robinson, " formerly of Sussex county, Delaware, at present of Nova Scotia", whom in 1778 his Whig neighbors had •' ordered to surrender himself for trial or stand attainted for treason" :

I give and bequeath unto my eldest son. Thomas Robinson, Four Hundred Pounds in cash, Nova Scotia currency. Also I give my said son my pinchback watch, chain and gold seal. Also my Negro Boy named Manuel, also the bed and furniture I sleep on, with my silver spectacles.

Also—I give and bequeath to my daughter Arcadia Cannon Two Hundred Pounds in cash, Nova Scotia currency. to be paid to her by my executors, together with my Negro woman Priscilla and her child Sally.

Item—I give and bequeath to my brother Peter Robinson a Negro boy named Philip, by trade a black-smith, and now in my said brother's possession.

Some interesting facts are found in the late Dr. Patterson's'•Life of James McGregor. D. D.", grandfather of Professor McGregor of Dalhousie University. The Rev. Daniel Cock, the much-esteemed Presbyterian pastor at Truro in 1788, was very greatly surprised one day to receive an unusually bulky letter from James McGregor, the young Presbyterian minister at Pictou. The latter minister had learned, to his amazement, that Mr. Cock had had in his possession two slaves—a mother and daughter. The mother, given him, it is said, in Cornwallis, he had sold because of her unruly conduct ; the daughter, whom he seems to have secured by purchase, he had retained. There could be no question that these bondwomen were treated with kindness ; but to young McGregor, recently from Britain, where the controversy

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