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54   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

" Negro girl slave", to her "executors, administrators and assigns for ever". In the event of the death or re-marriage of the widow, the testator directed that at a convenient time thereafter the slaves, cattle and stock and other articles left for her use should be sold at the discretion of his children " either at auction among themselves or at public vendue as the major part of them shall agree and think best", the proceeds to be divided according to appended instructions. A bill of sale, of similar tenor to those just mentioned, may be found in the registry office at Pictou. By this paper Archibald Allardice. mariner, makes over to Dr. John Harris, of Truro, as security for forty pounds advanced him, "one negro man named Sambo, also one brown mare and her colt". In Hams county, in 1;89, as private papers show. Captain John Grant disposed of a Negro girl, one of the nine slaves brought with him from New York, to Robert lCillo, of Halifax, receiving for her thirty pounds. The presence of slaves at Halifax at this time is recognized in an advertisement of a pawnbroker, dated January 14, I;S8. in which he states that " it is particularly desired that no apprentice, bound servant, nor slave will apply, for no business will be transacted ".

Shelburne records of the period present the historical student with some peculiar reading. In the magistrates' court record of the old Loyalist town may be found details of an interesting trial there in 1788. The defendant, one Jesse Gray, who had received a large grant of land at Argyle for military service at the South, had sold to William Mangham, of Shelburne, a colored woman—Mary Postill, for one hundred bushels of potatoes. No exception was taken by the court to the bargain, the charge against Gray being one of misdemeanor, it being alleged that he was not the legal owner of the chattel sold. Proof having been furnished that the woman had been his


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