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50   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

three classes of colonies, the Loyalists from the planting portions, where the severer style of slavery was in vogue. being in the majority. Hence the term " servant " proved one of only temporary application, and the designations " slave " and " the property of " appeared almost as frequently in official records of early Shelburne as they might have been expected to occur half a century since in a Southern city.

A detailed statement of advertisements to be found in the Halifax weekly journal during the three years succeeding the eventful immigration of 1783, having reference to absconding slaves or slaves to be sold, would become wearisome to general readers, although a few might pause to read an announcement in as large letters as the style of the day would permit, in the A'o:a Scotia Gazelle and Weekly Chronicle of June 24, 1783 " To be sold at Public Auction on Saturday, the 28th inst., at the Golden Ball, a Negro wench, twenty-five years of age, a good house servant". Of documents relating to the legal transfer of slaves, a sufficient number has been found in several of the county registry offices to vary the monotony of real estate transfers and the arrangements of probate courts, but from various circumstances it may be presumed that only a few of the transactions in human chattels during those years are now known on earth.

Recorded papers establishing the transfer of a slave woman to successive owners in Halifax can be seen in book twenty-three, in the registry of deeds' office of Halifax. On December t t, 1783, " Alexander Campbell, late a captain in the South Carolina Loyalists, for and in consideration of the sum of forty pounds currency", conveyed to Thomas Green, Esq., late a captain in the Royal Nova Scotia Regiment of Foot, a " certain Negro wench named Nancy", who, on the same day, " personally appeared " before Geo. \\'m. Sherlock, J. P., and " freely


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