Previous Slavery in Canada (1899) Next

 

THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   47

Slavery in this restricted form continued to receive recognition for some years in the journals of the time in Upper Canada. In the Upper Canada Gazette and American Oracle of October tt, 17s;, Messrs. NV. & J. Crooks, of West Niagara, informed the public of their wish to " purchase a Negro girl of good disposition, from seven to twelve years of age." In the course of years, however, cash and lands came to be regarded as less precarious property than human chattels, and sellers apparently proved more numerous than buyers. At 'York (Toronto), in December, 1800, the Gazette announced •' to be sold"—" a healthy, strong Negro woman, about thirty years of age," who understood " cooking, laundry, and the taking care of pantry," and could also "dress ladies' hair." In the Niagara Herald of January 2, 1802, there was offered for sale " a Negro man slave, eighteen years of age, stout and healthy," who had ., had the small-pox" and was "capable of service either in the house or out-doors." Terms would be made easy to the purchaser. and " cash or new lands received in payment." A few days later, through the columns of the same paper, " the Negro man and woman, the property of Mrs. Widow Clement," were offered "for sale." They had " been bred to the business of a farm," and would be " sold on highly advantageous terms for cash or lands," on application to Mrs. Clement. In t8o6 the Hon. Peter Russell, of Toronto, who had previously been receiver-general of the province, and during the absence in England of Governor Simcoe administrator of the government, advertised for sale. in the Gazette and Oracle, two of his slaves, both of them " servants for life." " Peggy," who three years before been advertised as absent without her owner's leave, was aged forty years, and " Jupiter," her son, about fifteen. For the mother the price was one hundred and fifty dollars ; for the boy, " tall and strong for his


Previous Slavery in Canada (1899) Next