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THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   43

territory a number of other Loyalists lingering in dependence and abject poverty in Britain, patted an Act " for encouraging new settlers in his Majesty's Colonies and Plantations in America." According to this Act, which was published in the several colonies, any person after August t, 1i90, a subject of the United States, removing thence to any of the Bahama or Bermuda Islands. or to any part of the province of Quebec or Nova Scotia, having first obtained a permit to reside there from the governor of the colony, was at liberty to bring with him any Negroes, household furniture, clothing, etc., the furniture, utensils and clothing not to exceed the value of fifty pounds for each white person in the family and that of forty shillings for each Negro, the sale of any Negro or other property being strictly forbidden within twelve months. Through this legislation a number of slaves were brought into Upper Canada between 1790 and I;93; and a few others were probably added to the slave population by the many families who—like the Ryersons and others—left the Maritime Provinces, New Brunswick in particular, about the same period or a very few years later, for the more level and roomy territories at the west.

With this action on the part of the British government the authorities of the newly formed colony of Upper Canada were somewhat dissatisfied. Both the lieutenantgovernor—Simcoe—and the chief-justice—Osgoode—had small regard for slavery. The former had written to a friend during the preceding year that the principles of the British constitution did not admit of slaver-, which was also condemned by Christianity. To this statement he had added that " from the moment that I assume the government of Upper Canada. under no modification will I assent to a law that discriminates by dishonest policy between the natives of Africa, America or Europe."'

I " Site a Papers," L, p- 497-


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