Previous Slavery in Canada (1899) Next

 

THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   41

given by Dr. Canniff in his "Settlement of Upper Canada. with Special Reference to Bay Quinte." The Rev. John Stuart, previously Episcopal missionary to the Mohawk Indians, in writing in his memoir respecting his permitted removal to Canada. remarks : My Negroes, being personal property, I take with me, one of which being a young man and capable of bearing arms. I have to give one hundred pounds security to send back a white prisoner in his stead." Captain Joseph Allan took with him from New Jersey, at the end of the war, to Upper Canada three slaves. The two men, some years later, ran away to Lower Canada. Their owner pursued them to Montreal and spent ten days in a fruitless search for them. The third slave—a woman—he sold with her child to Silas Hill. This boy was afterwards sold to Abram Barker, who retained him until he became, according to law, free at the age of twenty-one. Major Van Alstine's slaves, whom he treated with patriarchal kindness, lived in great comfort in the old-fashioned Dutch cellar-kitchen in his home in Fourth Town. In a note to the author of the above-named volume Sheriff Ruttan informed him that his uncle "brought two negro servants with him who were very faithful, hard-working fellows." During the year of famine they were sent from Adolphustown to Albany " for four bushels of Indian corn—a dreadful hazardous journey through the forest, with no road and the snow very deep, yet they executed this mission and returned in safety."

Black Betty," owned by Nicholas Lazier, was said to have been one of the listeners to the first sermon of the first Methodist preacher at New York, and one of the earliest Methodists of Canada West. Leavens, of Belleville, bought a female slave of \Callbridge for one hundred dollars: a son of this slave was purchased by Captain McIntosh. Captain Herkimer and others in that section of country were also slave-proprietors. For one slave


Previous Slavery in Canada (1899) Next