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38   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

The total number of slaves in that section of Canada soon to be known as the province of Lower Canada or Quebec was in 1784, according to the official census of that year, only three hundred and four ; of whom two hundred and twelve were in the town and district of Montreal, four at Three Rivers, and eighty-eight in the town and district of Quebec.'

If, however, this small list of slaves at Montreal and Quebec received but a limited number of accessions through emigration from the revolted colonies, it seems evident that the advocates of slavery in that part of Canada became at this time more aggressive than they hitherto had been, through the presence of so many more bondmen in the neighboring provinces. In 1784, John Black, a Negro who had served as a seaman in the king's service, was obliged to appeal to Governor Ilaldimand to protect him in his liberty, of which Captain Martin, by whose wife he was then employed, was seeking to deprive him. Through the Montreal Gazette in March, 1784, Madame Perrault offered a Negress for sale ; and a week later appeared an advertisement of a second, "about twenty-five years of age, who has had the smallpox and goes under the name of Peg." Four years later, in March, 1788, a claim for the delivery of "two Negro wenches" was preferred before the Montreal court of common pleas and judgment given that the slaves should be delivered up to the plaintiff. About this date, in the columns of the Quebec Gazette, a "hearty Negro boy, about fifteen years of age, well qualified to wait on a gentleman as a body-servant," was offered to any purchaser; and in the same journal, in October, 1i93, was announced an offer of sale of " a stout Mulatto man, aged twenty-three years ; has been used to house-work, speaks both

1 •' Canadian Archives." 1889, p. 39-


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