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3o   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

part of the county of king's adjoining the county of St. John. The three black men and one black woman who arrived with Major, afterwards General, John Coffin, at St. John in May, 1784, and went with him and his family to the tract of land near Westfield, afterwards known as the Alwington or Coffin Manor, came, no doubt, in the capacity of slaves or " servants for life."

In Queen's county also slavery was endorsed by the practice of leading residents. The inventory of the estate of Richard Hewlett, Esq., of Hampstead, shows that farmer, once a daring officer in the presence of the French at Frontenac, and of the Whigs of the Revolution, to have been, at the time of his death in 1790, owner, among other property, of "one Negro boy valued at twenty-five pounds." At Gagetown also were proprietors of slaves. Through an advertisement in the Royal Gazelle and New Brunswick Advertiser for August 20, 1799, a reward of five guineas, or of three guineas for either of them, was offered for the capture of two Negro men—" Gill, a dark Mulatto with short curly hair, square shoulders, bow legs and walks clumsily ; " and Dick, " remarkably black, with a scar on his cheek and another on his chin," the "property of the subscribers," who were Reuben Williams, formerly of Brooklyn, N. Y., and James Peters, a commissioner for the settling of Loyalists in New Brunswick, a magistrate and for many years a member of the House of Assembly, both in 1 799 being residents of Gagetown.

Among a number of others in .Sunbury county were the Hardings and Elijah Miles, of Maugerville, the latter a captain in De Lancev's Third Battalion, and after the peace a leading man in Sunbury. In the lower section of the large county of York, and in the neighborhood of Fredericton—the political capital, near which such Mary-land Loyalists as had escaped from the shipwreck of the " Martha" near Cape Sable, and a large detachment of


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