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THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   27

fled from Pennsylvania and New Jersey to New York, had formed an association in that city to settle " together on the River St. Johns in Nova Scotia." A very few of their number, who must have been included in the list of those having a " Birthright among the people commonly called Quakers," rather than in the membership of the "Society," had served as officers in certain Loyalist corps. At the head of the agreement to remove to Nova Scotia, drawn up and signed in New York in June, 1783, was the prohibitory notice, in a bold hand-writing. " No slave master admitted" ; in accordance with which it was ruled, as the fourth regulation, " that no slaves be either Bought or sold nor kept by any person belonging to said society on any pretence whatsoever."

For what reason Messrs. Samuel Fairlamb, John Rankin and George Brown, agents selected by the association to locate the lands granted its members for new homes, chose a tract at Beaver Harbor and not one upon the River St. John is not known. A prompt departure from New York for the new homes in the wilderness must have taken place, since a letter written in October, 1783, mentioned a Quaker settlement at Passamaquoddy, and on January lo, 1784, Aaron Andrews received from the government of Nova Scotia payment for " 71,000 ft. of boards and t{t,oco shingles" certified by a government agent to have been " delivered to the Quaker Refugees settled at Beaver Harbour, Passamaquoddy." A similar certificate shows that on an adjoining tract of land had been located another body of associated Loyalists called by the government agent the " Annabaptist Refugees."t From the quantity of building material allotted to the two bands of settlers, it may be presumed that the Anabaptists largely outnumbered their Quaker neighbors, but an inference of accordance on the subject of human bondage

t •' Public Documents of Nova Scotia," Vol. yo9, Nos. 6a, 63.


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