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THE LOYALISTS AND SLAVERY.   23

tion of their representative to England—Thomas Peters. a former sergeant in the Black Pioneers, that Lieutenant John Clarkson of the Royal Nan', a brother of the celebrated Thomas Clarkson of anti-slavery fame, was sent to Nova Scotia in 1791 by the Sierra Leone Company to arrange, at the expense of the British government, for the transportation of all freedmen desirous of removal to the new African colony ; as the result of which mission a fleet of fifteen ships with eleven hundred and eighty. Negroes on board, from various parts of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, sailed from Halifax on January- 1$, :792, for Sierra Leone.

The still-enslaved Negroes brought by the Loyalist owners to the Maritime Provinces in 1783-84 were classed as "sen-ants" in some of the documents of the day. Lists of Loyalist companies bound for Shelburne, made out, it is probable, under the direction of British officers whose dislike to the word " slave" would lead them to use the alternative legal term, contain columns for " men women, children and servants," the figures in the

servants"' column being altogether disproportionate to those in the preceding columns. With Captain Andrew Barclay's company of fifty-five men and women and forty-nine children were no less than fifty-seven serants, thirty-six of these being owned by four families. Stephen Shakspeare was accompanied by twenty servants, and Charles Oliver Breuff, goldsmith of New York, who died many years later at Liverpool, by fifteen. The brothers James and Alexander Robertson, publishers in New York and afterwards at Shelburne of the Royal American Gazette, brought twenty, and Alexander Robertson, jr., of Pennsylvania, six sen-ants with his family of four persons. Isaac Wilkins, of Westchester county, New York, a brother-in-law of Lewis Morris—one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and father


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