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22   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

observing that, if the sending them away should hereafter be deemed an infraction of the treaty, compensation must be made to the owners by the British government, in view of which event he had directed a register to be kept of all Negroes sent away, specifying the name, age and occupation of each slave, and the name and place of residence of his former master. " Had these Negroes," he concluded, " been denied permission to embark, they would, in spite of any means to prevent it, have found various methods of quitting this place, so that the former owner would no longer have been able to trace them, and of course would have lost in every way all chance of compensation." 1

This arrangement having been reached, each fugitive received a certificate which dispelled his fears ; and in a short time, in transports provided by the commander-inchief, a large number were conveyed to Burchtown, near Shelburne, Nova Scotia, where they received lands as soon as these could be surveyed for them, and, for three years. if not for a longer period, such rations as were distributed by the British government to the Loyalists in general. About the same time other liberated slaves were brought in British warships direct from Charleston, S. C., to Halifax, whence part of them made their way to lands promised them at Shelburne and Preston. Other freed blacks were similarly settled at Digby, St. John, and adjacent points. It was to these freedmen, at the solicita-

IJudge Jones, in his., Loyalist History of New York," says that Congress and the legislatures of the several States eagerly accepted Sir Guy Carleton 's proposal. He adds :—"A valuation was made and approved of. The money, it is true, has never been paid. What occasioned it ? .1w abwlutr refusal ow Mr part of the .l merkaws to amply with a singf& artiek in the treaty is favor of the Loyalists." The articles referred to by Judge Jones were numbers five and six, providing for restoration to Loyalists of confiscated estates and protecting against future conscription and confisation, etc. This counter refusal on the part of the British was probably one cause of the hostility on the part of the South towards Great Britain which led to the war of tSt 2, in opposition to the well-known wishes of the people of the Northern States.


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