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IO   NOVA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

Still more suggestive of slavery in its most sombre aspects is an advertisement in the Halifax Gazelle for May 15, 1752: " Just imported, and to be sold by Joshua Mauger, at Major Lockman's store in Halifax, several Negro slaves, as follows : A woman aged thirty-five, two boys aged twelve and thirteen respectively, two of eighteen and a man aged thirty."' And in a 76o, the year following that in which Malachy Salter's letter was written, citizens of Halifax read in their paper of November 1st : " To be sold at public auction, on Monday, the 3rd of November, at the house of Mr. John Rider, two slaves, viz., a boy and a girl, about eleven years old ; likewise, a puncheon of choice cherry brandy, with sundry other articles.' Thirteen years later, when the property of Joseph Pierpont was being disposed of at the same popular auction mart, his slave " Prince " was reserved for private sale. Other sales of slaves by auction had, however, taken place during the intervening period, for in 1769, an advertisement appeared in the Halifax paper, which stated that " on Saturday next, at twelve o'clock, will be sold on the Beach, two hogsheads of rum, three of sugar and two well-grown negro girls, aged fourteen and twelve, to the highest bidder."'

The Rev. W. O. Raymond, M. A.. of St. John, N. B., furnishes an extract from an original letter, which indicates the presence of a slave at the large business

 

 

t Joshua Maurer had been in business at Louisburg, but when that place was restored to the French in 3749 he removed his stock of goods to Halifax, where he was a merchant and distiller, and in 0851 agent victualler to the navy of Halifax. After having been one of the leading merchants of the province he went to England, where he acted as Provincial agent for Nova Scotia and secured a seat in Parliament

s In the archives of the Massachusetts Historical Society a fyk of the Ilalijer Gazette, extending over three years, may be seen, but no Pyles from 0'55 to 076o are known to be in existence. See Mr. J. J. Stewart 's admirable paper on " Early Journalism in Nova Scotia," in volume 6 of •• Collections of Nova Scotia Historical Society."

$ •• Memoir of Sir Brenton Halliburton," by Rev. Dr. Hill, p. 56.


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