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THE SLAVE IN CANADA.   9

prophets" as authorities to have been sincere, and their words to have been no mere " cloak of covetousness."

The presence of a young Negro slave in Halifax in 1759 would not have caused any great excitement among its citizens. It is possible that a few Negroes may have accompanied the original settlers of the town over the ocean. The number of unnamed male "servants" connected with the families of certain individuals—ten in one case belonging to that of a shipwright—is otherwise difficult of explanation. Their employment in the work incident to the building of a city on a site so rocky as that selected would be reasonable, while the great number of " slaves or servants for life"—as they were termed in legal documents of that period—to be at all times found in ports of the United Kingdom would render their transfer across the ocean easy of accomplishment. That slaves were present about that period at Halifax, whether from Britain or from New England, is certain, since in September, 1751, when the pressure of building operations had become lighter, the Boston Evening Post advertised : " Just arrived from Halifax and to be sold, ten strong, hearty Negro men, mostly tradesmen, such as caulkers, carpenters, sailmakers and ropemakers. Any person wishing to purchase may inquire of Benjamin Hallowell of Boston."

The name of one slave who in 1752 trod the streets of Halifax may be found in a will made on February 28 of that year and preserved among the probate records of the city. In this document the testator, Thomas Thomas, " late of New York, but now of Halifax," having arranged for the disposition of all his " goods. chattels and negroes," his plate excepted, of which he should " die possessed in New York," adds : " But all my plate and my negro servant Orange, that now lives with me at Halifax. I leave and bequeath to my son."


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