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8   SOYA SCOTIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

imposed on each Negro imported into the colony. In 16S7 a French refugee wrote home : " • You may also here own Negroes and Negresses. There is not a house in Boston, however small be its means, that has not one or two   Negroes cost from twenty to forty pistoles." Advertisements of slave transactions, surpassing in heartlessness those of Southern journals in more recent days, furnished an important part of the revenue of the New England newspaper of the eighteenth century. In the Weekly Rehearsal in 1737 Samuel Pewter informed the public that he would sell horses for ten shillings if the horse sale were accomplished, and five shillings if he endeavored to sell and could not ; and for Negroes •• sixpence a pound on all he sells, and a reasonable price if he does not sell.'

Some opponents of the system—and many persons in New England were in accord with Judge Sewall, the writer in 1700 of " The Selling of Joseph," the first anti-slavery tract published in America—were influenced by the motive which in part had prompted Louis XI \P. to permit the introduction of slavery into Canada—the turning of the heathen from their idols. The genuineness of the motive may sometimes have been open to question, as in the case mentioned by Mrs. Earle of a respectable Newport elder who sent many a profitable venture to the Gold Coast for ^ black ivory," and always gave thanks in meeting on the Sunday after the safe arrival of a slaver •• that a gracious overruling Providence had been pleased to bring to this land of freedom another cargo of benighted heathen to enjoy the blessing of a Gospel dispensation." On the other hand, the efforts made by ministers and laymen—themselves slave-holders—for the spiritual benefit of such slaves prove their citation of " Moses and the

•• Customs and Fashions in Old New England," by Alice Morse Earle, pp. 87-89.


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