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THE SLAVE IN CANADA.   7

successor. Through the absence of Mrs. Salter, the good man had learned what husbands are apt to learn only in such circumstances—that housekeeping or homekeeping has its peculiar worries. Malachy Salter, Jr., and the other little Salters were well and lively ; Hagar. the cook —undoubtedly a slave—had done her best to please her master by maintaining his credit as a generous as well as frequent entertainer ; but the worthy magistrate had found more than his match in the boy Jack. " Jack is Jack still," he wrote to dirs. Salter, "but rather worse. I am obliged to exercise the cat or stick almost every day. I believe Halifax don't afford another such idle, deceitful villain. Pray purchase a Negro boy, if possible."

The purchase of a Negro boy at that day in New England must have been easily possible. Slaves were more numerous at the time in Connecticut and Rhode Island than in Massachusetts, but in the latter province their number was by no means small. The General Court of the province in 1646, in its strong opposition to the " hainous and crying shin of man-stealing," had undertaken to send back to " Gvnnv," with a letter of explanation and apology, some negroes who had been kidnapped and brought to New England ; but rage at the cruelty of the savage red men, leading to the shipping of Indian captives to the West Indies for sale there, and the extreme difficulty of obtaining " help" for in-door and out-door work, soon blunted the feelings of the New England Puritan. In spite of the prohibition of " bond slaverie, villinage," and other feudal servitude by the ninety-first ankle of the Body of Liberties, in less than half a century he adopted the universal and unquestioned practice of Christian nations, and negro slavery flourished in New England as in Virginia ; Newport, in Rhode Island, being the northern centre of the African trade, and from 1707 10 1732 a tax of three guineas being


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