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STRONG DRINK, RELIGION AND LAW 323

a bell—a jarring, jangling bell, that kept the whole neighbourhood awake at nights. One Saturday night there was an unusual calm; the bell had disappeared from the cow's neck. Next morning it was found hanging from the middle of a telegraph wire that ran opposite a church in which the sermons were of the two hour order. That Sunday, the preacher had scarcely reached the `firstly' when a gentle breeze sprang up and jang-clang went the bell as it swayed on the wire. The sermon proceeded, but before it was fairly in the `secondly' stage, the wind had increased and the jang, clang, clang, brought the discourse to an abrupt and unusually early ending. `The Blazers' got their two birds with that one shot," chuckled Mr. Berry, "the cow no longer disturbed the night, and from that time on the sermons in that particular church were of moderate length.

" `The Blazers' were fine workers and had their own peculiar sense of humour. One night, while out on some other business, a quiet young man happened to be going the same way on horseback. He, too, suddenly found himself in a bunch of men on the roadway. Their unlooked for appearance rather alarmed him at the start, but their quiet demeanour and gentle conversation reassured him, and he thought he must have struck a lot of neighbours going home from prayer meeting. When he got into the stable, with a light, he found that the tail of his horse had been as neatly shaved as ever a chin has been shaved since by a barber with all the accessories of electric light and upholstered chair.


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