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292   THE PIONEERS OF OLD ONTARIO

of Americans in its employment and one night a fight began at the tavern between the Americans and a number of Canadians. The former soon got the worst of it and were driven for shelter to their camp across the way. There was one negro in the American party, and he came in for some of the hardest knocks. People say that after the scrap was over, it was hardly possible to tell which was his face and which was the back of his head. If a white man had received such a pounding, his head would have been reduced to a pulp. A few years ago when Wightman Goodfellow tore down the old tavern, bloodstains, resulting from this and other fighting, could still be seen on the walls.

"Churchill, known in the early days as Bully's Acre, was another great place for fighting. At the old show-fairs you might see a scrap at any time you chose to turn your head in the direction from V which the noise was coming. There is, by the way, an interesting story of the manner in which Churchill got its name. The first church in the neighbourhood was at the sixth line. A tavern-keeper located on the same corner and named his place `Church Hill Tavern.' Believing the fourth line corners a better location he later on moved there and carried his sign with him, and thus the name `Churchill' was transferred from the sixth to the forth.

"Nor was the consumption of liquor confined to taverns. At almost every store a pail of liquor and a cup stood on the counter and all comers were at liberty to help themselves. No logging-bee could be held without an abundant supply of the same sort of refreshment, and,


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