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UP BRUCE AND HURON WAY   265

"After the incoming settlers had located their lands, they frequently tramped forty or fifty miles in order to make their payments at the Crown Land office in Southampton. Not a little of the money used in making payments was English gold, and this was usually carried in belts next the person. Those carrying their money in this way would, on arrival, go into a room off the office, strip, remove their belts and then come back to the office and pay over their money."

A story very similar to that told by Mr. McDonald was the one given me about the same time by A. Livingstone, who was then living a little west of the town of Durham, in the neighbouring county of Grey. When Mr. Livingstone moved to his new home from Toronto in the late 'fifties, it was necessary to make the journey in winter because roads were impassable in summer. "Orangeville at that time consisted of a store, one of two taverns, and a few houses," said Mr. Livingstone. "There was a fair road from Orangeville to Durham, but from the latter place there was nothing but a `blaze' to mark the road to the lot I had selected, four miles west. Our nearest neighbour was three miles off in the bush; and, although a little milling was then done in Durham, most of the wheat grown in our town-ship was taken to Guelph, fifty miles away, to be ground.

"The first spring after our arrival, we planted potatoes in the little clearing made during winter, and then I and my two brothers walked down to Vaughan to earn money with


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