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UP BRUCE AND HURON WAY   261

pence per bushel, while cord-wood went at seventy-five cents to one dollar per cord."

In the summer season, the River Saugeen was made use of by a number of Bruce pioneers in reaching the interior of the southern parts o, that county. Other pioneers, landing at Southampton from lake vessels, made their way up the river in canoes. "The current was too strong to paddle against," Thomas Bryce of Dumblane told me, "and so one man had to walk along the shore and pull the canoe with a rope while another held the craft off the land with a pole. Many went up as far as Paisley, a distance of fifteen miles, in this way. My people came in the other way. Striking the river at Walkerton we built a raft, placed our supplies on it, and floated twenty-one miles down stream to our destination. Several other families did the same. Each family built its own raft, and when the journey was completed, the raft was left to float at will on down the river."

Mr. and Mrs. Cook were of those who came in by way of Southampton in 1851, and Mrs. Cook had with her four children, aged from one to eight. "Whatever will you do with these poor little chicks up here?" was the first greeting she received on landing. It is no wonder solicitude for the children was expressed. "The shanty to which we went had a bark roof and this roof leaked so badly that when it rained my husband had to hold an umbrella over us when we were in bed," said Mrs. Cook. "The floors were made of such lumber as drifted ashore from passing vessels. Once, when the children were ill, my husband went to Port


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