Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next

 

184   THE PIONEERS OF OLD ONTARIO

say he would sooner chop all day in the bush than grind half a bushel of wheat in the old coffee-mill. In the course of time Eagle purchased an ox, fitted it with Dutch harness, and used this to haul his grists to I3elfountain. At last an enterprising man arranged to erect a mill at Bayview, and the whole neighbourhood turned out to assist in the erection. Despite my brother-in-law's early poverty, he left an estate of forty-thousand dollars when he died at eighty. And notwithstanding his early hardships, his doctor said that he would have lived for a century had death not come as the result of an accident."

A third story was supplied by Peter Spiers, of May field, with Peter's maternal grandfather, John Bleakley, as the central figure in the tale. Mr. Bleakley was with Sir John Moore at Corunna, and with Wellington at Salamanca. Like a number of other old Peninsular and Waterloo veterans, Bleakley came to Canada when his fighting days were over, and he was one of the first settlers in Chingacousy, locating on lot seven on the fifth concession.

"When my grandfather settled here," Mr. Spiers said, "it was a common thing for settlers to get lost in the bush, and to guide the lost ones in finding their way out of the forest, my grand-father was often asked to sound a call on the trumpet he had carried with the Royal Artillery in Spain. At a later date he used his trumpet for another purpose. When taking a load of chickens, butter, and garden truck to Toronto he would carry his trumpet along, and with this he would sound the `assemble' on nearing the old


Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next