Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next

 

166   THE PIONEERS OF OLD ONTARIO

Without waiting to get my gun I rushed to the defence of the flock and jumped on the back of a wolf I found attacking a fine ewe. The brute was so surprised that he ran for the bush with-out waiting to see what had dropped on him. The ewe was somewhat mauled, but I doctored her with turpentine and not many days after-wards she gave birth to a pair of fine lambs. After 'I had released this ewe from the wolf, I went at a second of the marauders, which was attacking another of the flock, and beat him off with a fence rail. I was a little too late in this case and the second sheep died of her injuries."

Nor were animals the only victims to be attacked by wolves. R. L. Huggard, when living in Whitby, told me that James Lytle was once treed by wolves near Kendal in Durham County. "After climbing the tree," said Mr. Huggard, "Mr. Lytle broke branches and, using these as clubs, tried to drive the wolves away, but when the animals snapped at his feet he was glad to climb back to safety and remain on his perch until the besiegers disappeared with day-break. When at last Lytle, almost frozen, did get down he found the snow around the base of the tree packed as hard as a sleigh track.

"More fortunate was a man named Morrison who lived near Uxbridge in the early days. This Morrison was a famous fiddler and his services were in great demand at the winter dances. Frequently, after the dancers had gone he tramped home alone. One winter night, as he was trudging along with his fiddle tucked under his arm, he was surprised by a pack of wolves. A roofless old shack was near at hand,


Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next