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BY WAY OF YONGE STREET   129

by the Americans and then turned against the British. A Major, of the well known family of that name in Pickering, had a piece of flesh flicked from his leg by the same discharge. Mr. Miller's mother heard the explosion when the old fort at York was blown up as the Americans entered the town after capturing it, and Mr. Miller himself as a lad heard the boom of the first gun fired in the skirmish at Montgomery's Tavern in 'thirty-seven.

"After school had been hastily dismissed on the latter occasion and 1 was on my way home," said Mr. Miller, "I met a company of Highlanders headed by skirling bagpipes coming out of Vaughan, on their way to join Mackenzie, but as the latter was already in retreat they were too late for the affair. For weeks afterwards loads of prisoners passed our door on Yonge Street on the way to Toronto to stand trial for . high treason. Many of those in charge of the prisoners had themselves been implicated in the rising and took this means of turning aside suspicion from themselves. The worst of the direct effects of the rebellion was not the tearing of men from their families. It was the feuds, lasting for years, which originated at that time. Years afterwards, `you are a rebel' or `the son of a rebel' was the signal for a fight. When men gathered at grist-mill or for the annual `training day' the whiskey hardly started flowing before a fight commenced in some corner, and in a short time the row became general.

"One of the worst consequences of the freedom with which liquor was to be obtained at this period," continued Mr. Miller, "was seen


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