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ON THE PENETANG TRAIL   125

McAlmon "through tangled brushwood and round upturned roots and cradle-holes ... to the chosen grave in the wilderness where now, I hear, stands a small Presbyterian Church in the village of Duntroon."

On several occasions Samuel Thompson had walked to Toronto, a distance of ninety miles. In 1834, before leaving Sunnidale, he made his first trip, "equipped only with an umbrella and a blue bag, ... containing some articles of clothing." The first part of his way was over a road strewn with logs over which he had to jump every few feet. Rain came on, and as night approached he found himself far from any human habitation. IIe returned to "a newly-chopped and partially-logged clearing" he had passed on the way. Here lie found a small log hut in which the axe-men, who had been at work, had left some fire. He "collected the half-consumed brands from the still blazing log-heaps, to keep some warmth during the night, and then lay down on the round logs in the hope of wooing sleep."

"But," he adds, "this was not to be. At about nine o'clock there arose in the woods, first a sharp snapping hark, answered by a single yelp; then two or three at intervals. Again a silence, lasting perhaps five minutes. This kept on, the noise increasing in frequency, and coming nearer and again nearer, until it became impossible to mistake it for aught but the howling of wolves. The clearing might be five or six acres. Scattered over it were partially or wholly burnt log-heaps. I knew that wolves would not be likely to venture among the fires,


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