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ON THE PENETANG TRAIL   121

 

 

Thompson gives an interesting account of the method of clearing the land, and in this connection points out that in the Sunnidale district some of the young women were almost as expert with the axe as the men. One of these, Mary—, "daughter of an emigrant from the county of Galway ... became in time a `firstrate' chopper,

and would yield to none

of the new settlers in the dexterity with which she would fell, brush, and cut up maple or beech." She and her

elder sister, "neither of

them older than eigh-

teen, would start before day-break to the nearest store, seventeen miles off, and return the same evening laden each with

a full sack flung across

the shoulder, containing   --- G

about a bushel and a half,

or ninety pounds weight of potatoes." One of

"She miscalculated her final

Mary's neighbours a cut and the side nearest to young lad, Johnny, a Mary springing suddenly out,

struck her a blow so severe as

son of one of the early to destroy life instantaneous-

Scotch settlers in the ly•"

Newcastle district, who

was about her own age, was a famous axe-man. Mary was anxious to try her skill with the young Scot and got her brother, Patsy, who was Johnny's working-mate, to vacate his place for her. She proved herself quite as skillful as

TREE

MARY'S LAST

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