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ON THE PENETANG TRAIL   83

bride, a Miss Yeomans, and the trip across Lake Simcoe was made in a boat rowed by the prospective groom.

"The law required the posting of notices of intention to marry in three prominent places for three weeks before marriage. A widower, a Quaker about to remarry, put up one of his r vices in the cleft of a tree, hoping thereby to comply with the law while at the same time avoiding publicity. It happened, however, that a search party, while hunting for a man who had been lost in the bush, came across this notice and soon made it public enough to comply with the most rigid of legal requirements. One day, when father was away from home, a negro came to our place to be married. When this man found father was away he wanted my mother to act, on the ground that the Bible pronounced man and wife one. He contended, therefore, that what one could do the other could surely do as well. However, the colored man was told he would not only have to wait until father returned but until notice could be given also. Three weeks later, after legal notice had been given, when father went to perform the ceremony, he found the couple already living together as man and wife. One couple, far from either minister or magistrate, did not have the ceremony performed in their case until one of their sons was grown up.

"The first Methodist minister in Innisfil town-ship was Hardy by name, and he was hardy by nature. His field was from Penetang' to `The Landing'; he covered that distance twice a week on foot and held nine services in the seven days.


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