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74   THE PIONEERS OF OLD ONTARIO

dian trade as well, "and there was," as a grand-son of one of the Crown Hill pioneers expressed it, "a general belief that Penetang' was destined to be the metropolis of tipper Canada."

The Penetang' dream of the Pioneers has not come true, but Crown Hill, which owes its origin to the existence of the old naval station on Georgian Bay, has to its credit some-thing that cannot be claimed for any other rural section of Ontario. It gave to the province the first head of the provincial Department of Agri-culture and in the son of that head the first farmer premier of the province. The Drurys, Partridges, and 1licklings were among the first to come in along the upper end of the Penetang' Road, settling in 1819 near where Crown Hill now is; the Lucks, another large connection, coming in a year later. The Drurys came from England; the Lucks and Partridges, from Albany, N.Y.

"When Grandfather Partridge moved in, he brought his wife and two children with him as far as Holland Landing," one of the third generation told me. "From Holland Landing he walked alone all the way to Penetang,' his route around the west side of Lake Simcoe to Kempenfeldt Bay being over a blazed trail. After satisfying himself as to the future of Penetang' he started to walk back, digging into the soil at intervals by the way in order to learn its quality. He walked twenty-five miles before finding what suited him, and finally located near Crown Hill, taking up four hundred acres in all, half on the Oro and half on the Vespra side. Having built a log cabin he went back to Hol-


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