Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next

 

50   THE PIONEERS OF OLD ONTARIO

riding and voting was continued for several days. On one occasion rival factions, each led by~ banners and fife and drum bands, met in the middle of the road. What might have been anticipated happened; banners were torn to rib-bons, drums smashed, and some heads were cracked as well. Something worse occurred on one occasion, when one man voted, as another thought, the wrong way. The offender was struck on the neck with a club and dropped (lead, and the `Cavan Blazers71 prevented the immediate arrest of the offender."

The story of Mr. Jones' father's selection of a lot is as interesting in its way as is a story told by the Honourable Manning Doherty of the refusal of his great grandfather to accept a farm located at the corner of Queen and Yonge Streets, Toronto. The first of the Jones family had secured the location on which the town of Omemee stands; but when he found this could be reached only by travelling over several miles of blazed trail, he traded the lot for four-teen bushels of wheat and bought lot eight, on the first of Clarke, which was then part of the Clergy Reserves. Years afterwards he was offered two hundred acres near by for one hundred dollars, but, although having ample funds, he refused to accept the offer. The property afterwards sold for one hundred dollars an acre. Dame Fortune, fickle jade though she is, and although her offers had been twice spurned—once at Omemee and again later on—would not be wholly denied. Part of the Jones homestead forms a section of the site of the village of

1 See Page 320 et seq.


Previous Pioneers of Ontario (1923) Next