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BOOKKEEPING   49

(BILL.) HAMILTON   

February 2   19

Mr. James Scott

BOUGHT OF A. WALLACE & CO.

RETAIL GROCERS

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

-

 

 

 

1

25

 

 

 

 

1.10

a

20

 

-

 

 

.15

 

45

 

 

Paid Feb. 2,

19—,

 

4

90

 

 

A.

(INVOICE.)

Wallace & Co.,

per M. T.

 

 

 

 

/

5

 

TORONTO, .

February 10    19   

4)

# Sugar

# Tea - bays Potatoes doz. Eggs

20 5 2 3

Mr. R. K. Spencer

j'f

Whitby

BOUGHT OF D. T. PAGE & CO.   0) '3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terms : Net 30 days.   WHOLESALE STATIONERS(S

 

 

 

'7

 

3

M. Envelopes # 4160    

1.50

4   50

 

 

 

2

yr. Pens # 164µl -   -   -

.55

1   10

 

 

 

5

rms. Treasury Foolscap I6#   -

1.60

8

13

60

 

 

Less 3%   -

 

 

 

40

 

 

Received Payment,

 

 

13

20   j

 

 

Feb. 11, 19—,

 

 

 

 

 

D. T. Page & Co.

 

 

I

 

 

K.

 

 

 

NOTE.—The sign # means number when placed before figures, and pounds when placed after figures.

72. Business Papers—Orders.

An Order is a written request drawn by one party, called the drawer, un a second party, called the drawee (the payer or giver), in favour of a third party, called the payee (the receiver).

Kinds of Orders : (1) Orders requesting the payment of money or the giving of goods, commonly called orders; (2) bank cheques; (3) inland or domestic bills of exchange, commonly called drafts; (4) foreign bills of exchange, commonly called bills of exchange; (5) bank drafts ; (6) post office orders; (7) postal notes; (8) express money orders. (See Sections 103 and 104.)

The last set exemplified the use of cheques. In this set we shall take up orders for money or goods ; this class of order is seldom used, but the pupil in bookkeeping should know how to deal with it. A farm hand or other employee may buy goods and give an order on his employer, because his employer has not the ready money for his wages ; the merchant receives the order and charges the goods to the employer ; or the employer may himself give the order, asking the merchant to let his employee have goods on his account, and in this case also the merchant will charge the goods to the employer. Orders may, however, be used between business men themselves.


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