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CONCLUSION   185

enlightened common sense, and does not take into account the habits and even the prejudices of ordinary people.

A statute with which the public is intimately concerned, such as the _Municipal and Assessment Acts, school laws, etc., may seem to the scientific legislator very imperfect in one way or another, but he may do more harm by changes in it than will result from leaving it alone. These Acts may not always be models of draftsmanship, but if they express their sense in plain language, that is sufficient for their proper administration by the councils, boards and officers required to carry them out.

It is a mistake to consider that there is much hasty legislation. Most of the important Acts passed in recent years have been the result of months of consideration by commit-tees of the legislature, by the Government, and by legal and other officials of experience and skill, and have received the criticism and revision of the Assembly as well.

Generally months, sometimes years, before a Bill is drafted at all, the subject with which it is to deal is being turned over in the minds


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