Previous Laws of Ontario relating to Women and Children (1923) Next

 

EDUCATION   153

on one ground or another, to the promiscuous selection of passages from the scriptures by the teacher. The Government, of which Sir Oliver Mowat was then the head, hit upon a plan which they thought would remove any valid cause of complaint, and early in the eighties retained the services of the late W. H. C. Kerr, barrister, of Brantford, a very distinguished classical scholar, and a man of broad culture, with a remarkable literary taste, to compile a series of readings from the Bible for the guidance of the teachers. The work appeared and became immediately the centre of a bitter controversy. Charges of `'mutilating the Bible," of yielding to ecclesiastical pressure, and of being actuated by all manner of sinister motives were hurled at the Government. One prominent ecclesiastic even went so far as to carry the book into his pulpit, and after a fiery denunciation of the Government, throw it on the floor. As the result of some, perhaps not unreasonable, criticism, a revised and enlarged edition was prepared and is still in use in many of the schools. The writer, and others who had the privilege of knowing Mr. Kerr and who are in


Previous Laws of Ontario relating to Women and Children (1923) Next