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162   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

and the spores will be fixed where they fall on it.

The general impression is that toadstools are poisonous when eaten, but the charge is too sweeping. There are about two thousand species known and described. Out of that number less than fifty are believed to be poisonous, and the others are good food and very largely eaten. In Russia, especially, almost all kinds are freely eaten. In this province there is the deadly Aminita." To make matters worse, this is closely related by family ties to the edible mushrooms. The resemblance has been the death of many people, who were deceived by appearances, and ate the poisonous fraud. It is of a medium size, with a yellow-russet or pale-yellow cap, and a white stem and gills, and when full grown has a shrivelled veil furled about the stem. At an earlier growth the veil covers the gills. The distinguishing mark that brands it as dangerous is not always, nor often, in sight. The stem rises out of a little cup with ragged edges: this is the sign ; have no further acquaintance with it, for even the smell of it is sickening to some persons. We have another that must not be eaten. It is known as the Fly-blow agaric, and one may find them in abundance — a large stout species, with a reddish or even red and


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