Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

160   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

realities that outrank the material objects that suggest them.

We have at least two common species of puff-balls. One is brownish-white, with a short stem, and somewhat pear-shaped and warty; this is the Lycoper(lon gemrnatum. The other rests close on the ground, is white, and a little warty; this is the Lycoperdon saccotum. They are both good food when properly cooked and plucked in season. They should be gathered when fresh, while the inside is pure white, cut in slices and fried in butter. Many good judges of such things prefer them to eggs.

Now we will take up another branch of this Fungus family. The toadstools are known to all who " take their walks abroad." There is one group or family of which there are many members common all about us. These are the Agarics, and the common mushroom of the table and market belongs here. They are shaped like an umbrella. On the under side of the cap, or pileus, are the gills, arranged around the stem, like spokes of a wheel. When it is just showing itself through the earth it is a tiny ball, but if we cut it in halves the indications of the umbrella-shape will be seen. When fully out of the soil there is a thin veil drawn over the gills, and it soon breaks, and shrivels up


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next