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154   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

bows and arrows, and moccasins and blankets, and now cling to the outskirts of the white man's towns and villages, living for the most part in huts, and using their mechanical aptitude in coopering, canoe-building and basket-making. They act as guides to hunters and fishermen, and iii these various ways, with a little planting, manage to live in a manner not well calculated to make the best of them. They are a quiet, orderly people, very hospitable and unselfish with one another.

The Indian family on the Molega Road consists of a widow, " Kate Jeremy, " and her married son and child, and an unmarried son. They live in a snug, clean cottage, have quite a farm, keep oxen and a horse, are very industrious, sober people. Even with them the old ingrained tendencies and dispositions crop out in their canoe-building, moose-hunting and fishing — occupations that demand some of their time.

What the future of this tribe will be it is difficult to tell with certainty ; but one may be sure that they will not come into close competition with the whites in any trade or business ; most probable that they will long continue to exist as a separate people, retaining their language but losing their peculiar customs. They are not long-lived, and a large proportion of them die


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