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MICMAC INDIANS.   153

results ; evidently there were, but they were disappointing in their meagreness and not propor• tioned to the effort made to produce them. Through the long and difficult labors of Dr. Rand, the student of human history has a dictionary of their language, and a collection of their folk-lore tales, and many items of interest besides.

It is a prevailing notion that this tribe is disappearing, but the census shows a steady in-crease, thus : 1851, there were 1.056 ; 1861, 1,407 ; 1871, 1,666 ; 1881, 2,125 ; 1892, 2,157.

It has been a very difficult task for the Indians to comply with the new conditions that the white man enforced upon them. From time reaching back thousands of years they had been hunters and fishers. Even as they walk on the streets and roads there is a soft yielding-at-theknee stealthiness of step that tells the story of their past life in the forest. To work the soil for a living is utterly foreign to their nature. In fact, to settle down in a place and remain there is contrary to their natural instincts as much as it would be to a wild goose. They can no longer live by hunting, and even white men, as a rule, in Nova Scotia find that farming needs a good deal of piecing out to yield a living. The Indians have given up their bark wigwams, their


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