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MICMAC INDIANS.   149

ing? The Great Spirit does right. He knows what is best for his children. We are satisfied. We do not want to destroy your religion or take it from you, we only want to enjoy our own.

" Brother, you have now heard our answer to your talk, and this is all we have to say at present. As we are going to part, we will come and take you by the hand and hope the Great Spirit will protect you and return you safe to your friends."

Red Jacket had a mind of his own, and clung to the old way of the fathers. It was his misfortune to come much in contact with the greed and intolerance of white men, and he could not believe in their religion.

The Indians of New England and the British maritime provinces were divided into many clans or tribes., In general appearance, customs and language they were much alike. The language did not differ more than English differed a century ago in England from shire to shire. The Indians of Nova Scotia did not call them-selves Micmacs, it was a nickname given them by the French. They were known as Souriquois. They were great believers in magic and witches, and Malilce was an old name for witch-craft, and out of this word was derived Micmac.


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