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142   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

were not destitute of fine qualities, and received the white strangers with dignified hospitality. They were quick to see the advantages of muskets and iron axes over bows and arrows and stone tools. In all the province there were about four thousand Indians. They were well acquainted with the shores and the interior. They had named the harbors, and head-lands and bays, and mountains and lakes, and could make maps of the country and far out-side to Quebec and New England. While they did not live in grand houses and make a great show in the world, still they were far from being a very low type of men and women. They had DO law books, but there was an unwritten code demanding the observance of the common virtues of life. In the nature of things they could not live in large communities, for they did not till the soil to secure food. Certain families had their homes from generation to generation in the same district. Among themselves they led a quiet life, in some measure subject to a head man or chief of the tribe, who was chosen for some fitting qualities. The Mohawk Indians from the State of New York were an adventurous, fearless tribe, looking for scalps, and became a menace and terror to the Indians of Nova Scotia and what are now the


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